About Time!

The 2017 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded jointly to Jeffrey C. Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michael W. Young “for their discoveries of molecular mechanisms controlling the circadian rhythm”.

Could chemistry students be the key to tackling neglected diseases?

Some of the greatest parasitic killers and diseases in the world are neglected. However, a new collaborative framework of chemistry students may be about tackle these overlooked killers.

Meeting of the Minds

The Brain is arguably the most complex organ in the human body. Over two days, Imperial College Neuroscience Society will showcase the very best neuroscience has to offer, covering a range of key concepts including neuropathology, neurosurgery and neuroscience. Get hands-on experience at our practical workshops, attend inspirational talks and network with those at the […]

And the Nobel Prize goes to…

It’s that time of year when outstanding advances in science are acknowledged and celebrated by awarding the Nobel prizes. Here’s all you need to know about the science behind the prizewinners. Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine This year, the Nobel Prize for medicine has been awarded to Japanese cell biologist, Yoshinori Ohsumi. The 71 […]

Creating Psychiatry

Join the Wellcome Collection in the first of two discussion events exploring issues in the contemporary mental health system. These ‘Shrink Radio’ conversations will be curated byRe:Create Psychiatry, a service-user-led exploratory platform based at the Dragon Café, which brings together people with lived experience of mental ill-health and medical professionals to stimulate dialogue and collaboration. […]

Science: Disrupt London Sessions – Future Health

The world of tech, startups, makers, innovators and collaborators are beginning to be welcomed in to the scientific ecosystem in a way never seen before. Science: Disrupt brings together the innovators, iconoclasts and entrepreneurs intent on creating change in science. Join us at Interchange for our 2nd Science: Disrupt London Session on the theme of FUTURE […]

Medical Magic in Mushrooms?

Ingredients in magic mushrooms may have profound therapeutic potential in the treatment of psychological disorders, but under current UK law, it’s almost impossible to study them. We ask Professor David Nutt where scientists can get their hands on some…

An Audience with Sir Mark Walport

Sir Mark Walport is the current Government Chief Scientific Adviser and is responsible for providing scientific advice to the Prime Minister and members of the Cabinet, advising the government on aspects of policy on science and technology, and ensuring and improving the quality and use of scientific evidence and advice in government. He is the former Director […]

Museums at Night: Vaccination- Yes or No?

Explore the specimen filled Hunterian Museum at night for this special event looking at our changing attitudes to vaccination. The British Society for the History of Science ‘Strolling Players’ will perform their specifically commissioned piece designed to educate and delight. Hear the Medical Historian and author Dr Richard Barnett talk about disturbingly beautiful illustrations of infectious diseases from his book […]

Symposium: People Powered Medicine

The Hunterian Museum has a fantastic number of human and non-human anatomical and pathological specimens in innumerable jars for your viewing pleasure that document the progression from the the 17th century through to modern day. Join them for a special day-long event that explores the relationship between the medical profession and the public it serves. Discover how the relationship between doctor […]

Scientists find link between Zika virus and neurological disease

A new study uncovers hidden complications of the Zika virus, as risk of developing neurological disease GBS increases amongst those infected.

Utilising adult stem cells to treat liver disease – from basic science to clinical trials

Professor Newsome’s laboratory focusses on trafficking and role of both adult and embryonic stem cells in the context of liver injury. This has allowed identification of the key molecular interactions that regulate the successful engraftment of such cells into the liver. In the largest randomised controlled trial of stem cell therapy so far,  he is treating […]

Thinking on Sunday: How should we use unproven treatments during an epidemic?

Dr Annette Rid discusses the key points of using unproven treatments during an epidemic, the ethical controversy and draws some important lessons for how we should use unproven vaccines and treatments during future epidemics. In 2013, the world began to witness an unprecedented Ebola epidemic in West Africa that is now smoldering. Ebola virus disease […]

The Art of the Image: Leonardo da Vinci and medical imaging

Leonardo da Vinci was one of the greatest anatomists ever to have lived. He personally dissected more than thirty human corpses to explore every aspect of anatomy and physiology, and recorded his findings in drawings of unparalleled beauty and lucidity. This talk will show his concepts as imaged today with the most up-to-date technology in […]

Changing Minds and Mental Health

What happens when people change their minds? In this lecture, forensic psychiatrist Professor Gwen Adshead will offer a historical perspective on changing minds, starting with a discussion of the role of medicine in changing minds. She will discuss the move from changing behaviour to changing thinking, and changing stories; and how modern mental health services […]

To Blame or Not to Blame: The Medical Profession and Blame Culture

Traditionally, medicine has been taught by imitation, apprenticeship and humiliation. Think Sir Lancelot Spratt. Whilst that has clearly improved, there persists, in many areas, a blame culture. Following regulatory changes and various hospital scandals there is much ‘holding to account’. The combination of tradition and punitive language has done little to foster a just culture, […]