Celebrating Cassini: The Giant Kaleidoscope in Space

On the 15 September 2017, after almost 20 years of unprecedented insight in to Saturn and its satellites, NASA’s unmanned spacecraft, Cassini, will take it’s final flight, crashing in to the surface of Saturn. In this new series, we celebrate Cassini and some of its achievements.

The search for life in oceans beyond

Where is the best place to find living life beyond Earth? It may be that the small, ice-covered moons of Jupiter and Saturn harbor some of the most habitable real estate in our Solar System. Life loves liquid water and these moons have lots of it! Kevin Hand will explain the science behind why we think we know […]

Science Behind the Photo #45

Taken from Issue 22. Although seemingly beautiful and serene, this fiery image shows the hundreds of millions of stars at the turbulent heart of the Milky Way, all cocooned in cosmic gas and dust. The life of such a star is visible in its entirety, from the dusty regions of star birth, populations of young […]

News Round-Up: New Moon, Solar Windows, ‘Green’ Algae, Namibian Water

Pluto’s fifth moon discovered Image: Hubblesite A new moon has been found orbiting Pluto, bringing the number of satellites known around the former planet to five. P5 – the moon’s temporary designation – is between 10 to 25 km across (less than the diameter of London’s North Circular Road), and was discovered by scientists at […]

News round-up: New elements, Olympicene, Venus, SpaceX & Neutrinos

Guest contributor Conor McKeever kicks off our new fortnightly round-up of the key science news of the last few weeks. Two more place cards at the Periodic Table Video: youtube | periodicvideos Scientists have officially named two elements whose discoveries were announced last year. Element 114, first detected in 1999 by scientists at Russia’s Joint […]

Interview With an Astronaut

The docked Apollo 9 command and service modules and lunar module conduct the first docking maneuvers in space. This photo of command module pilot David Scott in the command module’s open hatch was taken by lunar module pilot Russell L. Schweickart on the fourth day of the Apollo 9 Earth-orbital mission. Image: NASA — INTERVIEW […]

Robonaut 2 Says “Hello, world”

It might be very obvious considering my past posts and – if you’ve ever met me – my constant ramblings on the topic, but I’m quite a fan of astronauts. In Issue 20 of I, Science we interviewed former Apollo astronaut Colonel David Scott, which gave us the opportunity to ask a question that is […]

The Descent to Mars

This article is taken from the Winter 2011 issue of I, Science. Joel Winston deconstructs the creative mechanism planned to help land NASA’s Mars Curiosity rover next year, and what this might mean for the evolution of space exploration. As Mars continues to intrigue us and yield ever more ambitious missions, even greater technological advances […]

Space Shuttle Columbia

Nine years ago today, the Space Shuttle Columbia burst into flames as it re-entered the Earth’s atmosphere after 16 days in orbit. All seven crew members lost their lives, and the debris from the craft was scattered across hundreds of miles. NASA diligently collected all the fragments that were found, and they are now stored […]

5 Space Breakthroughs of 2011

With the New Year comes the inevitable question of resolutions – how will you better yourself in 2012? The familiar answers of getting fit, losing weight, saving money and the like are a bit jaded, although surprisingly resolutions have been proven to make a huge difference to how we accomplish our desired goals. With this […]