Meeting of the Minds

The Brain is arguably the most complex organ in the human body. Over two days, Imperial College Neuroscience Society will showcase the very best neuroscience has to offer, covering a range of key concepts including neuropathology, neurosurgery and neuroscience. Get hands-on experience at our practical workshops, attend inspirational talks and network with those at the […]

Imperial Fringe: The Atoms Family

All families have their secrets. When atoms get together they could reveal answers to some of humanity’s greatest challenges. From the molecules that could secure our energy supply and limit climate change, to new high performing compounds that will improve our lives, and the biochemistry that could prolong them, find it all at the latest […]

From Mars to the multiverse: life, space and the cosmos with Martin Rees

Astronomer Royal and former President of the Royal Society Lord Martin Rees presents the 2016 Peter Lindsay Memorial Lecture. Unmanned spacecraft have visited the other planets of our Solar System (and some of their moons), beaming back pictures of varied and distinctive worlds – but none propitious for life. But prospects are far more interesting […]

Utilising adult stem cells to treat liver disease – from basic science to clinical trials

Professor Newsome’s laboratory focusses on trafficking and role of both adult and embryonic stem cells in the context of liver injury. This has allowed identification of the key molecular interactions that regulate the successful engraftment of such cells into the liver. In the largest randomised controlled trial of stem cell therapy so far,  he is treating […]

Applying the Molecular Principles of Engineering

Engineering creates innovations and solutions using empirical data, models, analysis, and properties of materials. Properties of solids, liquids, and gases represent a need that bridges all engineering disciplines, whether the property is the state of matter, its strength, thermal stability, conductivity, refrigerant performance, bioaccumulation, or binding strength of a drug to a cellular receptor. Engineering […]

Natural gas: what role can it play in the UK future?

Claire Carter a PhD student at SPRU, University of Sussex and member of the Sussex Energy Group last year completed a research scholarship at the Parliamentary Office of Science and Technology. The research output “Future of Natural Gas in the UK” POSTnote was published in November 2015. This briefing considers potential future pathways for the […]

Festival of Bad ad Hoc Hypotheses

BAHFest is a celebration of well-argued and thoroughly researched but completely incorrect scientific theory. Our brave speakers present their bad theories in front of a live audience and a panel of judges with real science credentials, who together determine who takes home the coveted BAHFest trophy. And eternal glory, of course. BAHFest makes its international […]

Children’s Christmas Lecture

The Universe and the idea that we’re not alone has captivated our imaginations for centuries. And while we’ve yet to discover life beyond Earth, this doesn’t stop us trying! With several space missions to look for alien life planned for the near future, Astrobiologist Dr Zita Martins will take us on an exciting journey to help us […]

The data revolution: it just got serious

Since the birth of the internet our ability to create and share data has step by step been reshaping our lives. In the last month the data revolution got serious, drawing the attention of leaders from around the world with the launch of a new Global Partnership on Sustainable Development Data at the United Nations […]

Light and Dark Matters: Instagram Light Project with Oliver Lang

How does light transform through photography? Mobile photography has become a global medium and an established form of visual communication. In the lead up to Light and Dark Matters, Oliver Lang invites you and your mobile phone camera to capture the transformational effects of light and share them on Instagram. In a special event, a selection […]

King Solomon to Saint Mary: a journey through human retroviruses, ancient and modern

Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) slips under the radar of most healthcare workers, especially compared to its distant relative – HIV. With 10 million infections globally and twenty thousand carrying HTLV-1 in the UK alone this infection is neglected even amongst neglected diseases. Whilst infection does not cause symptoms in the majority, 1 in […]

Is the Microprocessor Under Threat?

Is the microprocessor under threat? Perhaps: certainly power consumption limitations reduce the proportion of transistors able to do useful work, fuelling a radical rethink of computational system design. Fortunately, custom hardware coupled with modern state-of-the art software design techniques may come to the rescue, potentially speeding up workloads by a factor of ten or more. […]

Research Showcase on Malaria

Malaria is a life-threatening disease caused by parasites that are transmitted to people through the bites of infected mosquitoes. In 2012, malaria caused an estimated 627 000 deaths, mostly among African children. Malaria is preventable and curable. Would you like to hear more about it from Imperial College researchers? Interested in the research perspectives from […]

New insights: the health of Julius Caesar

Cassius: But soft, I pray you. What, did Caesar swound?
Casca: He fell down in the market place and foamed at mouth and was speechless.
Brutus: ‘Tis very like. He hath the falling sickness.

Elly Magson investigates Julius Caesar’s malady, 2000 years on.