Alfred Russel Wallace: The great evolutionary theorist

Our understanding of evolution via natural selection was not pioneered by just one person. A tribute to the remarkable Alfred Russel Wallace.

New insights: the health of Julius Caesar

Cassius: But soft, I pray you. What, did Caesar swound?
Casca: He fell down in the market place and foamed at mouth and was speechless.
Brutus: ‘Tis very like. He hath the falling sickness.

Elly Magson investigates Julius Caesar’s malady, 2000 years on.

Event of the week: A Night with Venus – A Lifetime on Mercury

As part of our new science events listing, we pick an event coming up this week. Valentine’s Day at the The Old Operating Theatre Museum is looking at some of the consequences of love in the 18th Century.

Making Time

Why does Russia have 11 time zones while China has just one? Peter Sherman investigates the history, politics and technology behind some of the world’s most incongruous ways of telling time.

A history of dieting

On Wednesday 16th January, Alanna Orpen went to see the historian, writer and broadcaster, Dr. Louise Foxcroft, talk about her research on the history of dieting at the Wellcome Collection.  Here she tells us what she learnt… — Lord Byron; acclaimed English poet, influential literary figure and leading personality of the Romantic Period. But the […]

12 days of xmas: Drug discovery

Some festive fun. Jo Poole takes an imaginative look at how the twelve days of Christmas song relates to drug discovery from anti-depressants to paracetamol …

Reviewed: UK Conference of Science Journalists

UK Conference of Science Journalists 25 June 2012 The Royal Society, London “I think every writer, every journalist, every scholar, should tell you where he’s coming from before he tells you what he knows.” This is how Jay Rosen, associate professor of journalism at NYU, began his keynote speech. He went on to detail what […]

50 Years of the Internet

Map of scientific collaborations Guest contributor Julie Gould celebrates the Internet’s Golden Jubilee. There have been significant leaps in our understanding of science and technology in the last fifty years. Some have radically changed our world, such as our sending a man into space and the silicon chip. However, one tool above all has become […]

Maths and Imaginary Machines

This article is taken from the Spring 2012 issue of I, Science. Programming is a skill that allows us to develop and personalise the functions of computers – and anyone can learn to harness it, argues Michael Cook One of my favourite editions of historical webcomic Hark! A Vagrant! is about Ada Lovelace, daughter of […]

Museums at Night 2012: Lancing the Surgeons

Hunterian Museum The Royal College of Surgeons of England, 35-43 Lincoln’s Inn Fields, London Friday 18 May, 6-9pm If you’ve not been to the Hunterian museum before (or just haven’t been in a while), this is a chance to see the spookiest setting around in an even spookier light at the Hunterian Museum Lates tomorrow […]

Braaaains

Brains: The Mind as Matter Wellcome Collection, Euston Road, London 29 March 2012 – 17 June 2012 After my interest in intelligence was awakened by Horizon: the Hunt for AI, I decided to take a break from studying in the library at the Wellcome Trust and explore their temporary exhibition space by visiting Brains: The […]

Morbid Anatomy

Hunterian Museum The Royal College of Surgeons of England, 35-43 Lincoln’s Inn Fields, London Permanent exhibition Is the collection at the Hunterian Museum a Twenty-First Century freak show? Visitors meander around a darkened room filled with illuminated glass jars from floor to ceiling. Pointed fingers and gasps of surprise and shock punctuate the silence. Inside […]

The Bone Wars

This article is taken from the Winter 2011 issue of I, Science. The story of 19th century palaeontology is one of personalities and conflicts as well as fossils. Sophie Buijsen investigates the rivalry that fuelled an unprecedented rush of discoveries. In the ground below us lies a world that, in recent centuries, has slowly started […]