Science in the service of Henry VIII: Conserving a Tudor collection

The Mary Rose, a flagship of Henry VIII’s English fleet, sank off the coast of Portsmouth in 1545. The hull now resides in Portsmouth Historic Dockyard alongside a number of the discovered artefacts. These provide us with a unique insight into Tudor Maritime life and act as a time capsule for this particular moment in […]

Skeletons in the Closet: The Grant Museum

Continuing the Hunterian Museum’s Lunchtime Lecture series is this talk by Jack Ashby, Museum Manager of the Grant Museum of Zoology at University College London. The Grant Museum is one of the country’s oldest and best stocked natural history museums. Jack will tell its eclectic history, discussing both the highs ( museum’s controversial founder Robert Grant […]

The Tsar’s Cup (Friday Evening Discourse)

One of the last acts of Tsar Alexander I before his death in 1825 was to give Humphry Davy a silver-gilt cup — the Davy cup. It was a token of gratitude for Davy’s invention of the miners’ safety lamp ten years before. With appropriately explosive demonstrations, Frank James will showcase Davy’s experimental development of his lamp […]

If you can spray phlogiston, is it real?

In the first of three guest-curated talks by Michela Massimi, Hasok Chang discusses how we should understand cases from the history of science in which scientists were confident that they were directly manipulating entities which modern science considers nonexistent. The chemistry of “phlogiston” from the 18th century provides an excellent example.

Three Tales by Steve Reich and Beryl Korot

Ensemble BPM presents Three Tales, a video opera exploring three momentous scientific events from the twentieth century that examines our deepening relationship with technology; the crash of the Hindenburg zeppelin in 1937, nuclear bomb tests on Bikini Atoll in 1946–1958, and the cloning of Dolly the Sheep in 1996.

Three Tales by Steve Reich and Beryl Korot

Ensemble BPM presents Three Tales, a video opera exploring three momentous scientific events from the twentieth century that examines our deepening relationship with technology; the crash of the Hindenburg zeppelin in 1937, nuclear bomb tests on Bikini Atoll in 1946–1958, and the cloning of Dolly the Sheep in 1996.

Wellcome Library Insights: Poison

Do untraceable poisons exist? Were there really poison epidemics in the 1850s? Why do so many murderous doctors choose poisoning? And how can the same toxic substances help save your life? We delve into the archives for answer.

Science on Myself

William Alexander believed that self-experimentation contributed to the benefit of mankind, but how far would you go in search of scientific truth?

A Night with Venus – A Lifetime on Mercury

Something different for you and your loved one as you prepare for Valentine’s Day? Come and hear how in the eighteenth century and earlier, just one night of love in the arms of Venus could lead to a lifetime with Mercury, a painful treatment for the dreaded pox or syphilis. Find out where this loathsome disease originated from in the sixteenth century and the variety of painful treatments available for it in the Georgian age when the cure could indeed often be worse than the disease itself.