Mind the Brain

To celebrate the 20th anniversary of the Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience opening its doors, we are hosting a day of short talks showcasing the diverse research that is performed here. Mind the Brain will feature short 15-minute talks from 12 different researchers at the forefront of cognitive neuroscience. Topics will range from how we form […]

Museums at Night: Vaccination- Yes or No?

Explore the specimen filled Hunterian Museum at night for this special event looking at our changing attitudes to vaccination. The British Society for the History of Science ‘Strolling Players’ will perform their specifically commissioned piece designed to educate and delight. Hear the Medical Historian and author Dr Richard Barnett talk about disturbingly beautiful illustrations of infectious diseases from his book […]

Symposium: People Powered Medicine

The Hunterian Museum has a fantastic number of human and non-human anatomical and pathological specimens in innumerable jars for your viewing pleasure that document the progression from the the 17th century through to modern day. Join them for a special day-long event that explores the relationship between the medical profession and the public it serves. Discover how the relationship between doctor […]

New insights: the health of Julius Caesar

Cassius: But soft, I pray you. What, did Caesar swound?
Casca: He fell down in the market place and foamed at mouth and was speechless.
Brutus: ‘Tis very like. He hath the falling sickness.

Elly Magson investigates Julius Caesar’s malady, 2000 years on.

Science on Myself

Considered risky by some and essential by others, self-experimentation has a long history in medical science. Emerging in the scientific revolution, self-experimentation became increasingly popular towards the early 20th century. From cardiology to pharmacology, there are countless examples of scientists using themselves as guinea pigs in search of answers.

A Night with Venus – A Lifetime on Mercury

Something different for you and your loved one as you prepare for Valentine’s Day? Come and hear how in the eighteenth century and earlier, just one night of love in the arms of Venus could lead to a lifetime with Mercury, a painful treatment for the dreaded pox or syphilis. Find out where this loathsome disease originated from in the sixteenth century and the variety of painful treatments available for it in the Georgian age when the cure could indeed often be worse than the disease itself.