Bridging the generation gap

A farmer can remember what has happened last year and the year before, and can prepare accordingly. But what about plants? How can they pass on their experience to their offspring?

Love is in the air

In the first online-only feature from I, Science Issue 30, Jess Norris finds out how our genes and environment – and our smell – affect who we fall in love with

Skiing’s Dirty Secret

With the summer coming to a close, your mind might be starting to wander onto more wintery thoughts. For some, this will mean deciding on where to take your next skiing holiday! However, I doubt that when booking your trip, the environmental policy of the resort will have crossed your mind. Whilst conservation may not […]

Residents Lead the Way

Residents lead the way in restoring the River Wandle Bright and early on a June weekend morning, volunteers in a park in South London are pulling on waders, grabbing litter pickers, and slipping their hands into protective gloves. It’s time to clean up the River Wandle. The River Wandle starts in Croydon, runs through South […]

Just Good Friends?

If opposites really do attract, then industry and academia must be made for one another. But should we be paying closer attention to the businesses that our best-loved institutions are getting into bed with? Today, in case you hadn’t noticed, marks the official start of the London 2012 Olympic Games. Athletes from around the globe […]

Land Grabs: Who’s Winning?

There has been much media attention recently over the extent of ‘land grabs’ for agriculture, or the ‘foreignisation of space’ occurring in Africa. Estimates suggest up to 230 million hectares of land have been leased or bought largely to produce food, animal feed or biofuel for export in the aftermath of the food and energy […]

Mirror Mirror on the Wall

Mirror mirror on the wall, who’s the greenest of them all? Eco-conscious consumers are increasingly trying to make decisions based on a company’s green credentials. But beneath all the marketing rhetoric, how can we really tell the environmental heroes from the villains? I’m not very good at recycling. Quite frankly, I struggle to see the […]

The Great Gulf Experiment

Two years ago today, a huge natural experiment was set in motion. Its costs were enormous. The explosion of British Petroleum’s Deepwater Horizon rig resulted in the loss of eleven lives and the spillage of an unprecedented 4.9 million barrels of oil into the surrounding Gulf waters, leading BP to put aside $20 billion to […]

Interview With a Deep Sea Biologist

Dr Brian Bett was interviewed for our Exploring the Deep feature. This is the full transcript of that interview. JC: What is like exploring the deep sea from a personal perspective? BB: In many ways I am a traditional field ecologist, it just happens that my field lies under 3-miles of water. So this means […]

WHAT SAUCE DO YOU FANCY?

        By Antonio Torrisi Friday, 1st July 2011. The first rows of the lecture theatre were full of smiling faces and eyes full of expectations. “Guys, I don’t know you but I’m in the mood for something sweet” Dave pointed to the audience.“Do you like ice-cream?” A wave of sound with mixed […]

When Business and Health Collide: Bhopal, India 1984

BY JOSEPH MALONE In 1969, as part of the “green revolution” in India, Union Carbide established a chemical plant in Bhopal to manufacture the pesticide Carbaryl. It contained the lethal compound Methyl Isocyanate (MIC), twice as heavy as air, meaning should a leak occur, it would create a blanket of deadly gas, smothering anything that […]

Can we really afford another COP out?

  Since the disappointment of the 2009 COP15 summit in Copenhagen, derailed by the twin distractions of the escalating global financial crisis and the revelations of the so-called ‘climategate affair’, talks to agree legally-binding global CO2 reduction targets have somewhat lost their way. Now, with just over a year to go before the Kyoto Protocol […]

Science Behind the Photo #27

Eight million cows roam Brazil’s Pantanal – the world’s largest wetland – and with all that beef chomping through the area’s vegetation, environmentalists are nervous that native mammals could be pushed out.  However, a recent dung study shows their fears may be unfounded. The Pantanal has been home to cattle ranchers since the mid-18th century.  […]

Science Behind the Photo #21

  Increasing average global temperatures are allowing alien species from Mediterranean climates to invade into more northerly areas. This is a major problem in the large alpine forest areas of central Europe. A prime example of such an invasive species is the pine processionary moth (Thaumetopoea pityocampa). This moth species, originally from the Mediterranean is […]

Science Behind the Photo #18

    Coral reefs around the world are rapidly being degraded by a number of human activities including over-fishing, coastal development, and the introduction of sewage fertiliser and sediment. Climate change is also a major cause of coral reef destruction. Coral reefs are often described as “the rainforests of the sea”, as they are home […]