And the Nobel Prize goes to…

It’s that time of year when outstanding advances in science are acknowledged and celebrated by awarding the Nobel prizes. Here’s all you need to know about the science behind the prizewinners. Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine This year, the Nobel Prize for medicine has been awarded to Japanese cell biologist, Yoshinori Ohsumi. The 71 […]

Science in the service of Henry VIII: Conserving a Tudor collection

The Mary Rose, a flagship of Henry VIII’s English fleet, sank off the coast of Portsmouth in 1545. The hull now resides in Portsmouth Historic Dockyard alongside a number of the discovered artefacts. These provide us with a unique insight into Tudor Maritime life and act as a time capsule for this particular moment in […]

Burlington House Summer Lates: The Science of Life

Explore the Burlington House Courtyard like never before, and discover the six learned societies that reside here, furthering the study of arts and sciences and sharing it with audiences around the world: At the Royal Society of Chemistry, grab a drink and join postdoctoral research scientist and previous winner of the Chortle Student Comedy Award […]

Return of the modern alchemist: just add water

Water is all around us – most of the planet’s surface is covered with it and it is the main ingredient in you. In this exciting demonstration lecture, Peter Wothers, star of the 2012 CHRISTMAS LECTURES, will show you some of the surprising properties and reactions of this substance you thought you knew so well. […]

Imperial Fringe: The Atoms Family

All families have their secrets. When atoms get together they could reveal answers to some of humanity’s greatest challenges. From the molecules that could secure our energy supply and limit climate change, to new high performing compounds that will improve our lives, and the biochemistry that could prolong them, find it all at the latest […]

When Food met Pharma: Delivery Strategies for Nutraceuticals

With growing prevalence of lifestyle-associated diseases, including obesity, Type II diabetes and cardiovascular disease, there is an urgent need and demand to try to prevent the onset of these diseases within our growing population. Nutraceuticals, along with appropriate diet and exercise, may provide a solution. They are defined as bioactive compounds isolated from food which […]

Periodic Success

The periodic table has been an emblem of science for over 100 years. Explosions, poisonings, space exploration and novelty Victoria parlour games are all contained within the chemist’s favourite poster.

Andrew Szydlo’s Blaze of Steel

Photo credit: Katherine McAlpine/Royal Institution After the storming success of his family-friendly talk at the Ri itself and online, Andrew Szydlo is back to take us through the fantastic world of steel and iron. Expect spectacular white hot reactions, wacky colour changes and chemical illusions in this demonstration-packed performance.

Is chemistry really so difficult?

Chemistry has progressed in a way few outsiders appreciate. It underpins many other sciences; from genomics and molecular biology, food and sports science, through to cosmology and planetary science. Why hasn’t the public impression of chemistry evolved too?

Secret Scientist: Lucia Burgio

Lucia Burgio: Senior objects analyst at the Victoria & Albert Museum Like most scientists, Lucia works in a laboratory. However, Lucia’s role at the V&A bridges the divide between art and science. Her time is spent studying the materials used on works of art. Using her chemistry background, Lucia is able to analyse, for example, […]

Mendeleev and Mendelevium

Mendeleev’s periodic table, a rectangle of colourful framed squares hanging on the walls of all chemistry departments in the world, is considered the “Gospel” of the chemist or, better, its portable version. Nowadays the periodic table is printed everywhere, from calendars to mouse-pads and bookmarks. We can say that it represents the essential order of […]

Welcome to Elements

A big and warm welcome to you, kind and enthusiastic reader: a big and warm welcome to the realm of matter, which matters a lot, because it’s all related to what we are and what we are surrounded by. The idea started around a year ago with a charming and enthusiastic event hosted by The […]

Science Behind the Photo #4

The startling yellow chemical in this photo is the ferricyanide anion, [Fe(CN)6]3−. Ferricyanide has a colourful history, rising to prominence for its use in the dark Prussian Blue dye when combined with iron. More recently, its electroactivity has become important in a range of applications. In this experiment, the ferricyanide is being used to mediate, […]