Could chemistry students be the key to tackling neglected diseases?

Some of the greatest parasitic killers and diseases in the world are neglected. However, a new collaborative framework of chemistry students may be about tackle these overlooked killers.

Scibar: A Night of Microscopic Proportions

When he’s not swabbing beards for bacteria on BBC’s “Trust me, I’m a Doctor” or getting members of the public to search for new antibiotics through his Swab and Send project, Adam Roberts leads his research group at UCL who are investigating the intricacies of antimicrobial resistance and how bacteria can withstand pretty much anything […]

Blame the brain: How neurononsense and psychobabble keep women in their place

There is a long history of debate about biological sex differences and their part in determining gender roles, with the ‘biology is destiny’ mantra being used to legitimise imbalances in these roles. The tradition is continuing, with new brain imaging techniques being hailed as sources of evidence of the ‘essential’ differences between men and women, […]

Wings of change

Long-term insect surveillance initiatives, such as the Rothamsted Insect Survey and the UK Butterfly Monitoring Scheme, allow ongoing assessments of the conservation status of large numbers of insect species against a background of increasing environmental change. This meeting will highlight the key findings from long-term insect surveys, including a 50-year monitoring project for British moths and butterflies.

Designing Nature

Biology appears to be less law-like than its sister sciences, but could we change this with design? Jane Calvert and Alistair Elfick discuss synthetic biology, an emergent discipline that aims to rationally design and fabricate biological devices; and how applying engineering principles to living systems might help us harness the power of the natural world. This is the final of three guest-curated talks by Michela Massimi.

Knotty Developments with DNA

Karin Valencia is a PhD student in Imperial’s DNA Topology research group. The term ‘DNA structure’ may bring to mind any number of things, from the television drama CSI to the famous double helix. Perhaps less familiar are the ‘higher-order’ structural features of DNA, namely knots. DNA in nature can be found to be ‘knotted’ […]

Science Game Shows Just How Hard It Is To Be Usain Bolt

We all do a bit of running, whether to a bus, to the shops, or away from an awkward encounter. But, have you ever thought about just how complicated the motion is? Well a game that has become all the rage on the internet will show you just how difficult it is. QWOP (named after the keys […]

Fish Go GaGa For Ginger Gene

  There may be plenty of fish in the sea but the medaka knows what it likes. A single gene mutation that causes the Japanese Killifish to be born a drab grey colour has proved to be a turn-off to members of the opposite sex. By over-expressing the ‘ginger gene’ in the medaka ‘super attractive’ bright […]

And the Oscar goes to…Science!?

Hollywood has never had a particularly good reputation for scientific accuracy. However, recently its science acumen has received a boost. It is currently the first time that the ‘reigning’ best actor and actress have been both been scientifically published. Colin Firth, has taken time out from swimming in country lakes and stuttering to co-author a […]

Giant Penguin Discovered in Peru

The dulcet tones of Morgan Freeman and the journey of the Emperor penguins warmed the hearts of millions following the release of March of the Penguins. However, the evolutionary trail of the species is equally as interesting. A new study, published in the journal Science, tells of the discovery of a ‘Giant Penguin’ fossil discovery with implications […]