Looking at mountains from a bird’s point of view

Emma Brown finds that mountains may not be the shapes we thought they were – when considering wildlife habitat – and this may be good news

Back from Borneo

The Natural History Museum hosts Nature Live events most afternoons in the Darwin Centre and at a recent Nature Live, rainforest researcher Dan Carpenter talked about his work in the rainforests of Borneo. I, Science’s Graihagh Jackson caught up with him and asked about the biodiversity hotspot that’s home to the orangutan.    

Eaten Alive in Borneo: Natural History museum live

Natural History Museum event proves that, when it comes to bugs, Elvis ain’t dead. It will come as no big surprise that the Natural History Museum has all manner of exhibitions, events and activities to keep you entertained for hours. But despite frequent visits – I’m a sucker for the animatronic T-Rex – this week […]

When the Familiar Vanishes

Adonis Blue This article is taken from the Winter 2011 issue of I, Science. Are we in a post-butterfly era? Kevin Edge explores the role amateur contributions could play in saving the British butterfly population. Mid-winter, many like to recall warm summer days when meadow, wood and cliff walks are alive with countless flowers, bees […]

Secret Scientist: Huw Griffiths

Huw Griffiths: Marine Biogeographer: British Antarctic Survey Dr Huw Griffiths divides his time between his office and a research vessel in Antarctica, where he works on a project to map biodiversity on the Antarctic seafloor. Huw’s focus has been on molluscs, moss animals and sea spiders as model groups to investigate trends at high southern […]

Vive la Différence

Variation is the driving force behind evolution and the reason why any species persists on this planet. Yet the science of human diversity is curtailed by controversial politics and outcries against racism. Some resistance comes from indigenous groups who feel they would be lab rats, but most comes from cautious government groups like the European […]

Science Behind the Photo #22

The Insurance Hypothesis Farming monoculture, such as in this corn field, can lead to decreased net ecosystem CO2 intake, meaning land becomes less useful in the fight against climate change. According to the insurance hypothesis: “Biodiversity insures ecosystems against declines in their functioning because many species provide greater guarantees that some will maintain functioning even […]

The unseen threat of nitrogen

Nitrogen is one of those elements that never really gets much attention. It’s colourless, odourless and mostly inert. For the most part, it’s a bit of a loner as well, only bonding with itself in the form of N2. Unfortunately, it’s the quiet ones that can prove to me the most dangerous, as an international […]

Guerrilla Gardening

What the hell is ‘guerrilla gardening’? Although the term was first coined in New York in the seventies, ‘guerrilla gardeners’ have actually been active in the UK since the 17th century. Put simply, ‘guerrilla gardeners’ are people who garden other people’s land without permission. The motivations for doing this can be diverse: the ‘guerrillas’ may […]