When black holes met

The Nobel Prize in Physics 2017 was awarded to Rainer Weiss, Barry C. Barish and Kip S. Thorne “for decisive contributions to the LIGO detector and the observation of gravitational waves”.

Caught in the act

The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2017 was awarded to Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank and Richard Henderson for developing cryo-EM for the high-resolution structure determination of biomolecules in solution.

About Time!

The 2017 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded jointly to Jeffrey C. Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michael W. Young “for their discoveries of molecular mechanisms controlling the circadian rhythm”.

Celebrating Cassini: The Lord of the Rings

In our final article of the Cassini series, we take a look at The Grand Finale mission – a daring set of manoeuvres through Saturn’s rings that will end in the destruction of the spacecraft this Friday.

Celebrating Cassini: The Giant Kaleidoscope in Space

On the 15 September 2017, after almost 20 years of unprecedented insight in to Saturn and its satellites, NASA’s unmanned spacecraft, Cassini, will take it’s final flight, crashing in to the surface of Saturn. In this new series, we celebrate Cassini and some of its achievements.

Celebrating Cassini: The Ethics of Plutonium Energy

When Cassini was being designed in the 1980s, an innovative plutonium energy source was developed to sustain it’s long journey. A source that would and still does carry considerable ethical considerations.

Cassini’s Astonishing Super-Senses

As part of our Cassini series, we take a closer look at some of the instruments onboard the spacecraft that have enabled us to experience the region around Saturn.

Celebrating Cassini: A Spacecraft’s Blog

On the 15 September 2017, after almost 20 years of unprecedented insight in to Saturn and its satellites, NASA’s unmanned spacecraft, Cassini, will crash in to Saturn, marking the end of its journey. In this new series, we celebrate Cassini and some of its achievements.

Skeleton in the Closet

Earlier this year a petition on Change.org appeared demanding a sea burial for Charles Byrne, a 7 foot 7 inch man who lived in the eighteenth century, but whose body was snatched from his coffin and displayed as a medical marvel.

Could chemistry students be the key to tackling neglected diseases?

Some of the greatest parasitic killers and diseases in the world are neglected. However, a new collaborative framework of chemistry students may be about tackle these overlooked killers.

Immunotherapy: A cancer revolution?

Until recently, researchers hadn’t given the immune system enough focus as a possible cancer treatment. A team at Imperial College is now looking for ways to improve on the initial successes of immunotherapy.

Music and Science: Stop Right There

In this Feature, we image what a conversation between Freddie Mercury and his producer might have been like, if his producer had been a massive science nerd and wanted to correct Freddie’s ‘alternative facts’.

Diary of a Researcher: Life at the (not-so-romantic) telescope

In the fourth part of our Diary of a researcher series, Josh Greenslade gives us an insight in to what life is like at an observatory 2,800m above sea level. One thing is for sure: not even making coffee is easy up there.