Climate change, habitat loss and biodiversity

The global climate is changing and many species are responding by shifting their distributions to track climate changes. Thus species are expanding northwards as new areas become suitable, but disappearing from other locations that become too hot and dry. The fascination of the general public for recording animals and plants in Britain has provided a […]

Britain-Nepal 200: celebrating Nepal’s success stories in biodiversity conservation

The rich biodiversity of Nepal is a tribute to its diverse climate, altitudinal variation and geography. In total 118 ecosystems have been identified, and the country is home to some of the world’s most remarkable plant and animal species. Over the past 40 years the government of Nepal has been at the forefront of conservation […]

What’s killing the killer whales?

Join expert’s from the UK Cetacean Strandings Investigation Programme (CSIP) to discuss the results of a 25-year long study into the causes of whale and dolphin strandings. Persistent organic pollutants (POPs), such as organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), are known to bioaccumulate in food webs and are potentially toxic to birds, fish and mammals.  Although the […]

What is the future for beavers in Britain?

Could beavers be successfully re-established in Britain and what affect would they have on local biodiversity? Beavers are ecosystem engineers which, by building dams and channels, create and maintain wetlands. Through these activities, beavers have the potential to increase local biodiversity, reduce downstream flooding, and improve water quality. In Britain, beavers were hunted to extinction […]

Health and disease in translocated wild animals

Over the last 50 years, an increasing number of wild animal translocations have been undertaken for conservation purposes. This two-day symposium will review the impact of disease on species restoration through translocation, and consider lessons learned to guide effective planning and implementation of future translocation projects.

The conservation science/policy interface: challenges and opportunities

Good communication between policy makers and scientists is a crucial requirement for developing policies that cost-effectively achieve measurable outcomes in conservation. Yet science and other forms of knowledge are not used effectively in policymaking; and policymakers do not always effectively inform scientists about their needs for scientific knowledge. Why is this so?
This event will bring together ecologists, conservation practitioners and policy-makers to discuss case-studies showing how science – policy interactions work in practice.

Are economic growth and biodiversity conservation compatible?

Economic growth has undoubtedly improved human livelihoods yet has equally convincingly had negative effects on the environment. Scientists are considering introducing a new geologic epoch, the Anthropocene, to capture humanity’s impact on Earth’s ecosystems. . This debate will bridge developmental and ecological economics with political and environmental science to explore how humanity can manage economic growth and biodiversity conservation.

Global land-use change: causes and consequences for biodiversity

Anthropogenic environmental changes, such as global land use and land cover change, driven by rapid human population growth and increasing demand for agricultural and forest products, are impacting the balance of the Earth system. This meeting will highlight the causes of land use and land cover change, investigate the impacts on biodiversity loss, ecosystem functioning and ecosystem services, and explore how non-market and public benefits, including wildlife conservation, can be incorporated into land-use planning.