News Round-up: Higgs (probably), Dark Matter’s skeleton, Private Asteroid Detective, TV-Powered GPS, Libel Dismissed

Higgs boson found … probably Image: CERN Scientists at the Large Hadron Collider in Geneva have announced the discovery of a new elementary particle consistent with the Higgs boson. The announcement, given to a packed auditorium at CERN and broadcast live over the Internet, was met with standing ovations from scientists across the world. Although […]

Reviewed: UK Conference of Science Journalists

UK Conference of Science Journalists 25 June 2012 The Royal Society, London “I think every writer, every journalist, every scholar, should tell you where he’s coming from before he tells you what he knows.” This is how Jay Rosen, associate professor of journalism at NYU, began his keynote speech. He went on to detail what […]

Access Denied

Giving the public access to the research that they fund is about much more than eliminating journal pay-walls. Open access is a hot topic right now. For months, academics have been taking an uncharacteristic interest in the detailed financials of the publishing world, and, for many scientists, the fight for our right to party – […]

Speaking Different Languages

This post originally appeared on Refractive Index, Imperial College London’s Science Communication Group blog. It can be tough being a member of ‘the public’. Imagine for a moment that you are on your lunchbreak and, being the responsible British taxpayer that you are, you decide to have a quick look at how your really quite-significant […]

Podcast: Autotune the Abstract

As a science communication student I find myself constantly coming across new and different ways people try and get across scientific data and knowledge. It can range from typical things such as news articles and blog posts to knitted representations of science. Whilst some of the crazy ways people try and get out their research may […]