Health Centre’s new strategy

This news story was published in the Imperial News section of the Super Science issue (issue 28), as an important Imperial College story from the past few months.

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The Academic Health Science Centre (AHSC) set out its vision for the future of healthcare at a recent Imperial College event and further cemented its place as a cornerstone of health research delivery.

Imperial established the first AHSC in the UK in 2007 with the NHS trusts from Hammersmith and St Mary’s Hospitals. Since then, the format has been rolled out at Cambridge University, Kings College London and Manchester University among others.

Presentations at the event outlined the strategy for the period 2014-19. Director of Imperial College AHSC Professor David Taube called the centre “an integrated structure that brings together all aspects of the College and Trust.”

Taube feels the forward thinking strategy will “allow us to use new technologies to put first-class healthcare not just by patients’ bedsides but into people’s bedrooms.”

Similar centres have opened in countries around the world including the Netherlands, the USA, Ireland and Sweden. Not only do they provide a means to deliver cutting edge medical discoveries to patients but they also form a platform for sharing information.

Chairman of Imperial College AHSC Sir Gordon Duff feels that Imperial’s new strategy will feed into this international network: “We’re creating an AHSC that will drive – not follow – the healthcare agenda in the UK and Europe,” he said.

Alongside the speeches, there was an exhibition of some of the latest technologies coming out of the Centres for Translational Medicine (CTM), which deliver the research to frontline healthcare. One CTM recreated heart surgery in a pop-up operating theatre, while the CTM for Brain Sciences and Diseases demonstrated their ‘EEG Pong’, a game that translates brain wave activity of the user into actions in a table tennis video game.

The Imperial College AHSC continues to prove itself as an effective way to speed up the time it takes for the NHS to access the latest and best quality treatments.

 

IMAGE: Wikicommons

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